M.A.Sc. Student in Electrical and Computer Engineering
Education:
Instituto Tecnológico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, 2013, BSc
                               
Biography:
I am a MASc student in Electrical and computer engineering, working under the supervision of Dr. Boris Stoeber . My research involves the design and fabrication of Microneedle electrodes for biosignal monitoring.

Before joining the Stoeber Lab, I spent some time working  at EYMSA as a product specialist of Linear accelerators for cancer treatment with radiotherapy. I also have some experience working in hospitals and clinical settings as I worked as an intern biomedical engineer at the Nuclear Medicine department of the National Institute of Cardiology Ignacio Chavez  in Mexico City.

I completed my BSc. in Biomedical Engineering at the Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education in Mexico

My professional and research interests include:

Nuclear Medicine, Radiotherapy, Microelectronics, Microelectromechanical systems, Micro -fabrication, Machine learning and basically anything related to biomedical engineering.

J. Lozano and B. Stoeber, “Microspike Array Electrode with Flexible Backing for Biosignal Monitoring,” 2019 IEEE SENSORS, Montreal, QC, Canada, 2019, pp. 1-4.

Abstract:

Interest in continuous biosignal monitoring has increased in recent years with the increase in popularity of wearable devices and smartphones. The electrode is a key component for biosignal recordings, but conventional wet electrodes are not suitable as they require skin preparation and the application of a conductive gel. One proposed solution for this problem is the microspike or microneedle electrodes as they have the potential of acquire spontaneous small amplitude signals, but they require complex and expensive fabrication methods. The present work proposes a simple fabrication method and design of a dry microspike array electrode with flexible backing made of low-cost conductive polymers and demonstrates EEG and ECG recording.